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AbstractThe difference between the idealization of anatomy atlases and the reality of human cadavers often frustrates gross anatomy students. To encourage students to celebrate rather than protest these differences, we describe a web site ARI (Anatomy Reports on the Internet) that allows students to document cadaveric findings online with photographs and text. We used several web languages for site construction, including mysql, php, html, and javascript. Faculty tools allow instructors to upload digital images of the structures, add relevant commentary, view and delete images, review submitted reports, and examine database statistics. Student tools allow dissection groups to choose and comment on images, enter and edit reports, and read reports submitted by other students. During the first two years of the site's use (2000-2001, 2002-2003), every dissection group at our institution submitted at least one report.